Genealoger

Family History and Genealogy Services

Listed as one of the "50 Top Sites for Genealogy Research" by Internet Genealogy, Aug/Sept 2012

Genealogy Resources

Types of resources used in genealogical research are listed below.  Links to resources are given on the left.

Family Sources

  • Address books
  • Adoption records
  • Automobile insurance papers
  • Baby announcements
  • Baby books
  • Baptismal certificates
  • Birth announcements
  • Birth certificates
  • Certificates and awards
  • Church certificates
  • Citizenship papers
  • Confirmation records
  • Credit statements
  • Death annoucements
  • Death certificates
  • Diaries or other ancestral writings
  • Diplomas
  • Discharge papers
  • Divorce papers
  • Draft cards
  • Driver's licenses
  • Emigration (departure) records
  • Employment records
  • Family Bibles
  • Family business papers
  • Family correspondence
  • Family heirlooms, artifacts, etc.
  • Family histories
  • Family interviews
  • Family letters
  • Family needlepoint
  • Family pictures
  • Fire insurance papers
  • First papers of citizenship
  • Funeral books and cards
  • Funeral programs
  • Graduation record
  • Gravestones
  • Health insurance cards
  • Heirlooms
  • Income tax forms
  • Land deeds and records
  • Legal documents
  • Letters, diaries and journals
  • Life insurance papers
  • Living relatives
  • Magazine subscriptions
  • Marriage certificates, wedding invitations, and marriage announcements
  • Military awards
  • Military documents
  • Miscellaneous family records
  • Motor vehicle registration
  • Naturalization papers
  • Newspaper clippings
  • Notes from previous family searches
  • Obituaries
  • Oral histories
  • Passenger arrival records
  • Passports
  • Pension applications
  • Personal items and papers
  • Photographs and photo albums
  • Probate/estate records
  • Property tax receipts
  • Receipts
  • Report cards
  • Religious papers
  • Samplers and quilts
  • School records
  • Scrapbooks
  • Ship manifests
  • Social Security cards
  • Union cards
  • Wedding announcements
  • Wedding guest books
  • Wedding gifts
  • Wills and administrations

Published Sources

  • Church histories
  • Church membership lists and minutes
  • City directories
  • City/town histories
  • Databases
  • Fraternal organization publications
  • Genealogical periodicals
  • Histories of settlers in area
  • Indexes, abstracts, and transcriptions
  • Library catalogs
  • Local histories
  • Newspapers
  • Organization directories
  • Prepared ahnentafels
  • Prepared descendancies
  • Prepared pedigrees
  • State/local genealogy society
  • State library
  • Telephone directories
  • Trade and industry publications

Vital Records

  • Birth records
  • Court papers
  • Death records
  • Marriage records
  • Probate Records
  • Wills

Other Records for Genealogical Research

  • Cemetery records
  • Census records
  • Church records
  • City directories
  • Court records
  • Draft registration
  • Emigration records
  • Family name associations
  • Fellow immigrant records
  • Fraternal organizations
  • Funeral/mortuary records
  • Genealogy/historical societies
  • Hobbyists
  • Hospital records
  • Land/property records
  • Local genealogists
  • Maps and geographic tools
  • Military records
  • Naturalization records
  • Neighbors and friends
  • Newspapers
  • Occupational/trade organizations
  • Passenger arrival records
  • Passports
  • Probate records
  • Queries to genealogy publications and web sites
  • Schools
  • Social Security records
  • Surname and obituary cards in public libraries
  • Tax lists
  • Tombstone inscriptions
  • Veterans organizations
  • Voters' Registration
  • Witnesses to marriages, births, etc.
  • World War I draft registrations
  • and more ...

Starting Your Genealogical Research

  • Start with yourself. Document your own life first.
     
  • Work backwards. Build the foundation of your genealogy with people you know, and then work on that missing ancestor.
     
  • Talk to your family. Exchange information with all of your aunts, uncles, cousins, and siblings. Talk to your parents and grandparents. Look at old documents and photographs. Get copies of public information, such as birth certificates, marriage certificates, death certificates, wills, etc. Research everyone possible in the census records.
     
  • Document everyone.  Learn all you can about each person, even indirect relatives. Document the vital events (birth, marriage and death), and also look at census, city directories, tax lists, wills, land records, church records, etc.
     
  • Document as you go. Your documentation should allow anyone to reconstruct your research without any previous knowledge of your family and without asking you any questions. Use standard source citation formats.
     
  • Use forms as aids. Use family group sheets, pedigree charts, time lines, correspondence logs, and research logs.  Some inexpensive genealogy software programs will print some of these charts for you. Also click on the forms button to the left.
     
  • Use the Family History Library (FHL) and Family History Centers (FHC).  The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also known as Mormons) has collected a wealth of genealogical information in books, microfilm, and microfiche, and an increasing amount of digital resources.
     
  • Surf the Internet. Do this after you document records from you home search. Use your favorite search engine, FamilySearch.org, Rootsweb, GenWeb, library sites, society sites, and even e-Bay. Plan and document your research.